Research Projects at KCU

KCU Student and Faculty Study of Spiritual Conflict Affecting Students Learning Patient Care Published by Family Medicine

Cindy Schmidt, PhD, KCU director of scholarly activity and faculty development, and OMS IV Student Andrew Dang have authored an article in the January 2021 issue of Family Medicine. Under the guidance of Dr. Schmidt, Dang conducted a study which found that medical students who had internal spiritual conflict were more disengaged when interviewing Standardized Patients whose patient case also had spiritual conflict. The findings point to the need to support students’ own spiritual needs in the context of supporting patients’ spiritual needs. Read the article from Family Medicine.

 

KCU Anatomy Chair Publishes Article on Capuchin Feeding Behavior in Nature for Clues to Human Dental and Orthodontic Conditions

KCU anatomy professor and chair Dr. Barth W. Wright's latest study is an outgrowth of his primary research program, which focuses on the influence of food material properties and ingestive behavior on craniodental adaptations and evolution in human and non-human primates. The monkeys in this study feed on mechanically resistant foods and exhibit craniodental traits that appear to be adaptations for the ingestion of these items. This makes members of this genus interesting analogs for a number of early fossil hominins. Dr, Wright's findings can help us better understand the ecological pressures that may have led to the modern human craniodental configuration, and help to explain why we as a species deal with particular dental and orthodontic conditions. Read the study abstract.

 

KCU Professor and Researcher Collaborates on Study of New Protein Marker in Dementia

As the world of science looks for cures in the battle against dementia, researchers have identified a new enemy. A newly-named pathway to dementia that has always existed, but now has a name: Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE. Kansas City University professor and researcher Abdulbaki Agbas, MSc, PhD, is part of the urgent quest to study and learn more about this pathway and disease. Read more...

 

KCU Faculty and Medical Students’ Work Published Alongside Other Leaders in the Field of Nuclear Receptor Research

October 2020 - Congratulations to researchers at KCU-Joplin, on the publication of a peer-reviewed article titled “Associations between Pregnane X Receptor and Breast Cancer Growth and Progression”.

The team led by Jeffery Staudinger, PhD, and Bradley Creamer, PhD and composed of KCU-Joplin researchers and medical students was invited to contribute to a special theme issue of the journal, Cells, an international peer-reviewed open access journal of cell biology, molecular biology, and biophysics. The special issue is titled "The Xenobiotic Receptors CAR and PXR in Health and Disease." 

“It is an honor to have our manuscript published in this special issue and to have our work appear with other articles contributed from absolute leaders in this field,” said Staudinger.

 

KCU Professor Developing Innovative Test for Early Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Disease

Dr. Abdulbaki Agbas, professor and director of research at Kansas City UniversityAugust 14, 2020 - Dr. Abdulbaki Agbas, professor and director of research at Kansas City University, is working to develop a blood-based biomarker that diagnoses Alzheimers disease and ALS before their clinical manifestations. Read about Dr. Agbas' research on the BioNexusKC site

 

Second-Year KCU Student's Research Published for Advances in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Treatment

Andrew Sulaiman, PhDAugust 12, 2020 - Second-year med student Andrew Sulaiman, PhD, is a published first author in two new research papers in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences and in Advanced Therapeutics where he focuses on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC).

Through development of a combinational therapy, they improved cisplatin's TNBC targeting abilities while stopping cancer stem cell enrichment and resistance. His research findings may make cisplatin usage for TNBC more translatable in the clinic setting.
 

In the second publication, when the nanoparticle encapsulated therapy was compared to conventional chemotherapy, it proved better anti-tumor targeting effects and reduced rates of relapse and tumorigenicity after treatment, making this research an advancement in TNBC.

 

Graduate's Research Sheds Light on the Dreaded ACL Tear

May 18, 2017 - When Kyle Busch graduates from KCU on Saturday, May 20, his name will already appear on two major research studies that could impact the health of young athletes everywhere.

As a medical student Busch has been working with Dr. Matt Daggett, KCU alumnus and an orthopedic surgeon, alongside an international team trying to discover why girls involved in pivot-shifting sports suffer injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) at a rate far faster than their male counterparts. They partnered with Dr. Camilo Helito of Sau Paulo Brazil and gained unprecedented access to clinical samples. More...

 

KCU Receives NIH Grant to Study Causes of Microvascular Defects in Heart Disease

Aug.1, 2016 - Many American families are unfortunately all too familiar with the devastating effects of heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. By the age of 40 the lifetime risk of developing of heart failure in both men and women is 1 in 5. Despite important advances in medicine, current treatments do not prevent or reverse the progression of the disease. More...

 

Unintended Consequences of Chemotherapy – Heart Disease in Cancer Survivors

Dr. Eugene Konorev at Kansas City University studies the harmful effects of chemotherapy treatment on the cardiovascular system. The goal of his research is to mitigate these negative side effects enabling patients to enjoy a healthier life post-cancer treatment.

While chemotherapy has saved millions of cancer patients, it has also damaged the hearts of many cancer survivors. The American Heart Association reported that patient risk of heart failure increases 5% after eight chemotherapy treatments and the risk rises to 48% after 14 doses. More...


For more research projects, visit our blog!